On Air Now

Listen

Listen Live Now » 94.7 FM Central Wisconsin 102.9 FM Wausau, WI

Weather

Current Conditions(Wausau,WI 54403)

More Weather »
33° Feels Like: 26°
Wind: NW 8 mph Past 24 hrs - Precip: 0.07”
Current Radar for Zip

Today

AM Rain/Snow 43°

Tonight

Partly Cloudy 24°

Tomorrow

Mostly Sunny 46°

Alerts

Doctor accused of Nebraska revenge killings to be extradited

A combination picture shows photos of suspect Anthony Joseph Garcia taken in (L-R) 2006, 2012 and after his arrest in Illinois on July 15, 2
A combination picture shows photos of suspect Anthony Joseph Garcia taken in (L-R) 2006, 2012 and after his arrest in Illinois on July 15, 2

By Katie Schubert

OMAHA, Nebraska (Reuters) - A doctor described by police as fitting a serial killer's profile said on Wednesday he would not fight extradition to Nebraska from Illinois to face charges of murdering four people, including one of doctors who fired him in 2001 for erratic behavior.

Dr. Anthony J. Garcia, 40, has been held without bond in a county jail in southern Illinois since his arrest on Monday.

Garcia was fired as a pathology resident at Creighton University in Omaha in 2001 by Dr. Roger Brumback and Dr. William Hunter for erratic behavior, Omaha Police Chief Todd Schmaderer said at a press conference on Monday.

He is accused of killing Brumback and his wife, Mary Brumback, both 65, in May. He is charged with killing Hunter's son, Thomas Hunter, 11, and Shirlee Sherman, 57, the Hunter family housekeeper, in 2008, though police have said they believe they were not the intended targets.

Schmaderer told a news conference on Monday that Garcia "fit the elements of a serial killer."

Police have released few details about the case, but documents from the Indiana Professional Licensing Agency, where Garcia had applied twice for medical licenses, show he failed to complete residencies in New York, Illinois and Louisiana in addition to Nebraska.

Attorneys representing Garcia told the Omaha World-Herald newspaper that Garcia wanted to move forward and get the chance to prove his innocence. Extradition from Union County, Illinois, back to Omaha could take up to two weeks.

Schmaderer said on Monday Garcia had not lived in Omaha since his firing in 2001 but police have evidence that suggested he had visited the state at the time of the killings.

Search warrants were also being served around the country by task-force members at places where Garcia may have worked, lived, or where someone had a connection with him, Schmaderer said.

The task force had been watching Garcia and had Illinois State Police stop him when he was on the move, Schmaderer said. He had a .45-caliber handgun and showed signs of being drunk when he was pulled over, Schmaderer said.

According to documents from the Indiana Professional Licensing Agency, Garcia joined the Bassett-St. Elizabeth Family Medicine Residency Program in New York in June 1999, but was suspended for yelling at a radiology technician and resigned in December 1999.

The New York State Board of Professional Medical Conduct gave Garcia an administrative warning for his conduct on July 25, 2001 and said his name would be flagged if he applied for a state medical license in the future.

Police plan to execute a search warrant at Garcia's home in Terre Haute, Indiana, on Tuesday, Schmaderer said. Search warrants were also being served around the country by task-force members at places where Garcia may have worked, lived, or where someone had a connection with him, he said.

Garcia started his Creighton residency in July 2000 and was fired in June 2001 because he had called another resident's wife while the man was taking a critical exam and told her that her husband must return to the pathology department for an emergency, according to a letter from Creighton to Garcia.

After Creighton, Garcia started and withdrew from a residency at the University of Illinois at Chicago because of migraine headaches, he said.

Garcia also said he was "essentially fired" from a psychiatry residency at LSU Health Sciences Center in Shreveport, Louisiana, because he could not obtain a state medical license, according to the documents.

Louisiana's board of medical examiners rejected Garcia's application on February 27, 2008, just weeks before Hunter and Sherman were killed.

(Additional reporting by David Bailey; Editing by Carol Bishopric)

Comments